In brief: 4 water digitalisation stories

 

Artificial Intelligence (AI)4Water moves north to Edinburgh, Scotland

After making headwind with its first UK contract at United Utilities (UU), Canadian company Emagin is now working with utility Scottish Water to bring its AI solution to the city of Edinburgh.

On Twitter (see below) the company said:

“It’s always great to catch up with our friends from @scottish_water! Last week, we met to kick off our deployment across #Edinburgh, #Scotland.”

The news was posted to Twitter shortly before the announcement of Simon Traylen being hired as managing director of UK & Europe.

The UU contract will see a demonstration site set up in the OIdham District Metered Zone, selected due to its “remote control capabilities and high degree of instrumentation at sites”.

Digital water map for California made available

A digital water map of California water districts and groundwater basin priority levels is being made freely available for the first time.

The digital water map is a joint effort between water risk management company, AQUAOSO and California Chapter, ASFMRA, whose members are active in appraisal and management of agricultural properties and who provide consulting for agribusiness.

Although much of the information for the map is publicly available, it didn’t exist in the same place.

One of the purposes of the map was to help support some of the largest agricultural lenders, appraisers, brokers and agricultural investors in California to identify water risk at the parcel level.

More information on the digital water map can be found here.

Trinidad and Tobago look to the skies for leak detection

Satellite microwave technology company Utilis kickstarted the year with a deal in Trinidad and Tobago.

The island nations are moving into their dry season and the Ministry of Public Utilities has contracted with Utilis to provide its patented technology to identify sub-surface leaks in the municipal water distribution system.

Several site verification efforts will be carried out in collaboration with the Water and Sewage Authority (WASA), supported by the Inter-American Development Bank.

“The islands of Trinidad and Tobago have had some difficult times in the past few years when it comes to their water supply and distribution systems,” said Utilis CEO, Elly Perets. “Our goal is to reduce the water lost by non-revenue leaks in their potable systems.”

The company was recently picked by Aquatech as one of ‘Five progressive digital water technologies to watch after its work with utility Yorkshire Water.

Dubai credits SCADA to reach leakage ‘world record’

Dubai may hold world records such as the world’s tallest building or largest shopping mall but now the Emirate nation is claiming a world record on reducing water losses.

Utility company Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) has said it has “made a new world record by reducing losses in its water networks”.

Data from DEWA showed losses in water transmission and distribution networks have been reduced from 42 percent in 1988, to 6.6 percent today.

The utility credited the introduction of a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system to monitor the water network as one of the reasons for the improved network operation.

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