Membranes supercharged using enzyme technology

  • 12-10-2018
  • Aquatech
  • Water treatment Membranes Europe News

Dutch and Danish companies join forces to supercharge membranes with enzymes to remove micropollutants

Companies from the Netherlands and Denmark are joining forces to integrate enzymes into membrane technology for the removal of pesticides and pharmaceutical residues from drinking water sources. 

Dutch membrane start-up NX Filtration has partnered with Danish enzyme specialist Novozymes and water technology firm Grundfos to enter an ‘explorative collaboration’.

“We are looking at a solution, which in a cost-efficient and effective way can make the water safe to drink. This can have a direct and positive impact on the fight to make water available to all as specified by the UN in the Sustainable Development Goals.”

Henrik Juul Nielsen
Senior Manager, Future Options & Innovation Management at Grundfos

The plans are to combine the enzyme-enhanced nanofiltration membrane with monitoring systems, to selectively remove small organic compounds from drinking water sources. 

Developed at the University of Twente, the membranes incorporate a very thin, polymeric selective layer as the basis, which passes the pure water but rejects the micro-pollutants. <>

To then bring the technology to market, as part of the 24Water project, NX Filtration worked with local SME Artecs followed by a final validation and system installation tested by water company Oasen.

Erik Roesink, general manager of NXFiltration (as seen in the video below), said: “I’m sure we will manage to get a breakthrough in the drinking water production scheme based on the technologies we have on board.”

Field tests for the new membrane will be initiated at the Grundfos headquarters in Denmark. 

Henrik Juul Nielsen, senior manager, future options & innovation management at Grundfos, said: “We are talking about large amounts of contaminated freshwater sources that are left untapped, unless treated correctly. We are looking at a solution, which in a cost-efficient and effective way can make the water safe to drink. This can have a direct and positive impact on the fight to make water available to all as specified by the UN in the Sustainable Development Goals.”

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